Dr. Bidhari Pidhatika

Dr. Bidhari Pidhatika

Dr. Bidhari Pidhatika

BIDHARI PIDHATIKA was born in Jakarta, January 17th, 1980. After graduating from high
school in 1998, she carried out a bachelor study in chemical engineering at Gadjah Mada University (UGM), Yogyakarta, Indonesia. She completed her study from chemical engineering at the end of 2002. In 2004-2006, she carried out an international master program at Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden. She then continued her study in the Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Switzerland, with an interdisciplinary Ph.D project, ranging from synthetic organic chemistry to polymer chemistry and materials science; from surface physics and chemistry to biochemistry and microbiology.
She received her Ph.D degree in February 2011, and since then has been working as a lecturer and researcher in Indonesia: Polytechnic ATK (2003-2013), College of Industrial Chemical Engineering (2014), and her current (2015-now) affiliation is: Center for Leather, Rubber, and Plastics (CLRP), Agency of Industrial Research and Development, Ministry of Industry, Republic of Indonesia. Dr. Pidhatika is a fellow of L’Oreal-UNESCO National Fellowship for Women in Science (awarded in 2011) and Alexander von Humboldt Georg Forster Research Fellowship (awarded in 2016), in which she was hosted as an experienced visiting scholar at the University of Freiburg, Germany. After her return to Indonesia in 2018, she was again awarded a research grant from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation under the Humboldt Return Fellowship (awarded in 2018). Her research interest includes the area of thin films, surface modifications, biopassive-, bioactive-, and dual-functional surfaces.

Tailoring of Surfaces

Why surfaces? Because surfaces matter! A material is generally chosen because of its bulk properties such as its elasticity, plasticity, tensile strength, transparency, and temperature resistance. However, the reaction with its immediate environment and the fate of the material are very often determined by its surface. The material’s function may fail due to unsuitable surface properties, for example, a tooth implant may fail and cause inflammation due to the formation of biofilm (bacterial plaque) on the implant surface. A contact lens may cause corneal irritation due to the lack of lubrication at the interface. Furthermore, bacterial infection to contact lens surfaces (two to four cases for every thousand users per day) causes inflammation of the cornea of the eyes. Catheterassociatedurinary tract infection causes complications to one million patients per year in the US among which fifty thousand patients/year are killed. Therefore, tailoring of surfaces to meet the required surface properties of a material plays a crucial role in the design of materials, apart from mechanical strength, toxicology, and biocompatibility issues of the bulk material.
During the lecture, we will discuss about surface properties, in particular those of relevance to biomaterials. According to American National Institute of Health, biomaterials is “any substance or combination of substances, other than drugs, synthetic or natural in origin, which augments or replaces partially or totally any tissue, organ, or function of the body, in order to maintain or improve the quality of life of the individual.” We will also discuss the performance, designing and tailoring of surfaces, as well as the characterization methods (spectroscopy, microscopy, etc.). The surface properties will cover surface chemistry (composition, contaminants, functional groups, biopassive layer, bioactive layer), surface energy (wettability, hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity), and surface structure (morphology, roughness, defects).
Tailoring of surfaces will include adsorption of monolayers of small molecules like phosphates, thiols, and silanes, through adsorption of biomolecules like proteins and sugars, to adsorption (grafting to) as well as surface growth (grafting from) of macromolecules (polymers) on surfaces.

Antibacterial surface coating: Chasing bacteria

Nosocomial bacterial infections associated with implanted medical devices such as catheters and artificial prosthetics pose an increasingly threatening problem given the fact that we are facing an increasing demand for medical implants due to the worldwide increase in life expectancy and that multi-resistant bacteria nowadays prevail in hospitals. Infections of implanted devices are usually very difficult to treat by systemic administration of antibiotics since the bacteria reside in biofilms where they are up to 1,500 times more resistant to antimicrobial agents than their planktonic counterparts. The lack of a suitable treatment therefore often leaves extraction of the contaminated device as the only viable option for eliminating the biofilm. Consequences are prolonged hospitalization, several revision procedures, possible amputation and even death. In this lecture we will discuss about antibacterial polymer coatings to combat bacterial infection on the implant surface. These polymers have a dual function: First they prevent the first step in bacterial infection that is bacterial adhesion onto the surface (biopassive function). Second, the polymers in addition carry an antibacterial moiety that can actively kill bacteria (bioactive function).