Teguh Triono, Ph.D.

Teguh Triono, Ph.D.

Teguh Triono, Ph.D.

Teguh Triono is a Senior Technical Advisor for The Zoological Society of London at the Indonesia Country Office, Bogor, West Java, Indonesia. He received a bachelor degree in agriculture from University of Brawijaya, East Java, Indonesia. He obtained his master degree in plant and fungal taxonomy from University of Reading, UK and a Ph.D. on ecology, evolution and systematics from Australian National University. The focus of Triono’s work with his colleagues are to implement integrated science and partnership for supporting onsite wildlife conservation and management and greenhouse gas emission reduction in Jambi and South Sumatra based on landscape approach.

Dr. Triono has received several international research funds and he was Program Director of the Indonesia Biodiversity Foundation, a CSO who supervised and managed over USD 130 million biodiversity conservation funds and Climate Change mitigation and adaptation funds from USAID, DFID-UKCCU, Norway, ACB and KfW, UNESCO-MAB and private sectors for both terrestrial and marine in Indonesia.

Making Science Matter – Keeping “The Roar” Stays in the Wild

Surf over internet on Sumatran Tiger! It will lead you to many facts on the tiger population’s decline and usually you will also faind their population’s threats. Tigers have lost many of
their habitats in Sumatra because of land use and land use change. Pressures are even worse due to forest and land fires during dry season and leaving these tigers in fragmented leftover forests. Like islands, the fragmented forests “captured” the tigers and kept them away from each other. If you are imagining that you live as a tiger, I believe you can imagine how difficult
your life can be in Sumatra.

To save the tigers, logically, you just need to connect those forest fragments and all done. In fact, it is not as simple as you think. It is like a snake and ladder game where you need to find the most possible and shortest way to reach your goal. Knowing the tiger and their habitat will provide you scientific ways to connect those “captured” tigers and save their lives.
I work with my team of field scientists in Jambi and South Sumatra, Indonesia
to observe tigers and its prey through series of surveys and monitoring. If you dare to be an ecologist and work with wildlife, I will show you my team findings in the forest, in the plantations, along river banks, near villages and along the border. Together, we will learn about tigers and their habitat as well as on how we collect, analyze and use scientific data for keeping “The Roar” stay in the wild.